Albatross the film – translating grief through art inspires global #beatplasticpollution movement

Some of the key images that have caught our hearts have been the result of some tireless individuals, who with artistic skills have been translating the throw-away-and-forget horror of our modern way of life. I'm sharing news that in a few days, a lead artist against pollution, photographer Chris Jordan, whose images early on impressed initial horror and grief on the state of our oceans, is releasing his feature length film Albatross free to the world on World Ocean's Day June 8, 2018.

Why ancient tree knowledge in Ireland matters today: Blackstairs Ecotrails film and Ogham tree-teaching stone

Today, Ireland only has remnants of its ancient forests and has one of the lowest levels of tree cover in Europe. While afforestation is promoted with plantations of conifers and native trees (tree cover across Ireland is around 12%) there is value in considering how ancient forests were once regarded. Ireland was deforested over many…Read more Why ancient tree knowledge in Ireland matters today: Blackstairs Ecotrails film and Ogham tree-teaching stone

First International Forest Day: social media and films show how 7 billion of us tied to health of our forests

Today is the first international day to globally celebrate our worlds forests. While we are all aware of the need to attend to our forests urgently, today is about the stories we create about our forests, the values we hold dear. The UN has since the International Year of the Forest in 2011 been reaching out to people across the world to ask them to show and tell us all about the forests that support their local environments.

American nature film: representations of dominion and imperialism

Cathy Fitzgerald reviews ecocinema book Film and the American Moral Vision of Nature: : Theodore Roosevelt to Walt Disney (2011) by Ronald B. Tobias. This book discusses nature dioramas of the early 20th century and 'how such animal exhibits conveyed a suspended visual statement of the newly understood superior natural order of nature, a new moral vision that became a powerful analogy to the rising and powerful modern America'. And later the repercussions: 'Throughout American nature cinema, from early films of the American West, to Africa and the South Pacific, to Disney’s animations and TrueLife nature documentaries...reveals that much of American nature film is 'couched nature within a uniquely American moral code' and imperialistic perspectives'

How far is heaven: a new film on relations between a New Zealand river and its communities

http://vimeo.com/deerheartfilms/hfih-trailer I've been lucky enough to catch some new documentaries at the 2012 NZ film festival... And this one, How Far is Heaven (2012) in particular relates to my previous post (the Aotearoa-New Zealand Whanganui river has recently been granted world-leading innovative legal status as an entity in its own right). Beautifully shot, this film…Read more How far is heaven: a new film on relations between a New Zealand river and its communities

New book: Ecocinema Theory and Practice

Just published a couple of days ago: Edited by Stephen Rust, Salma Monani, Sean Cubitt Published August 25th 2012 by Routledge – 344 pages Series: AFI Film Readers Introduction: Cuts to Dissolves: Defining and Situation Ecocinema Studies Stephen Rust and Salma Monani | I. Ecocinema Theory  1. The Eco-Cinema Experience Scott McDonald 2. The Aesthetics…Read more New book: Ecocinema Theory and Practice

My Paper Boat, Polar Bear and Talking Cat films head to Copenhagen

I was really delighted to hear this week, the winners of the 1minutetosavetheworld Climate Change Film competition and congratulations to all the organisers behind the scenes - the works are now spreading across the internet. I had only entered in the last week so didn't expect to be placed but more importantly it gave me…Read more My Paper Boat, Polar Bear and Talking Cat films head to Copenhagen